Abbey Glen - Press Coverage


New Jersey Herald


Pet memorial park to unveil reproduction of famous sculpture

Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park in Lafayette on Sunday will unveil a reproduction of a popular statue located in Japan. Many people in the United States may not know of the story of the dog, but in Japan he is nationally known.
The Akita dog, a large breed that originated in the northern regions of Japan, was given to his owner, Professor Eizaburo Ueno, at just 8 weeks old. For a couple of years, as the story goes, the dog would walk with Ueno, who taught at the University of Tokyo...

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New Jersey Herald


Japanese ambassador dedicates local memorial

Underscoring the human-animal bond universally understood by those who have ever owned a pet, Japanese Ambassador Reiichiro Takahashi began Sunday's dedication ceremony at Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park with a quip that instantly resonated with his American hosts.
"When my wife, Masako, and I go the movies, she doesn't care who dies in the movie as long as the dog lives", he joked. With the finesse of a seasoned diplomat, Takahashi then transitioned to telling the heartwarming true story of the dog whose singular devotion to his master...

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The Japan Times


Hachiko statue erected at New Jersey pet cemetery

A bronze statue of Hachiko, the Tokyo dog celebrated for its faithfulness, has been set up at a pet cemetery in New Jersey. The monument at Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park is a life-size reproduction of the male Akita dog's statue unveiled last year to mark the 80th aniversary of the animal's death. The statue was erected at the campus of the University of Tokyo's Faculty of Agriculture in Tokyo's Bunkyo Ward.
Hachiko's owner, a professor at the university, died while the animal was young...

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Maikoakis


The World's Most Loyal Dog, Hachi's Statue Debuts at Pet Memorial Park in New Jersey

Once upon a time, back in 1930's Japan, there was a dog named Hachi, a Japanese traditional Akita dog, who was waiting for his master, Professor Ueno at Tokyo University to come home every day at Shibuya train station at dusk. One day, the master collapsed from cerebral hemorrhage during the lecture and passed away. Not knowing what happened to his master, Hachi waited for his return at the station every single day for more than nine years...

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The Advertiser News


Bond between a man and his dog is a legend

At noon on Sunday about 150 people attended the unveiling of a reproduction of a legendary Japanese statue attesting to the bond between a man and his dog.
According to Derek Cooke, a co-owner of Abbey Glen Pet Memorial Park, an Akita dog named Hachi-kou is a Japanese icon and his story is an important part of Japanese culture. Hachi-kou, a beautiful and faithful Akita, was given to his owner, Professor Eizaburo Ueno, at just 8 weeks old. For years, local residents watched Hachi-kou and Professor Ueno together...

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